Reno newspaper promotes attackers in hate crime

By Brenda Norrell

The Reno Gazette Journal joined the copycat crew, copying information from two articles in Censored News. If the journalists who are receiving paychecks were doing their jobs, they would not have to sit in their easy chairs, and wait for the unpaid writers at Censored News to do it for them.

One article is about a Northern Paiute traditional gatherer being fined $800 by the Nevada Game and Fish.

The other article is disturbing, as the Reno Gazette Journal prints an extensive interview with the family of an accused attacker in a hate crime, without interviewing the victims.

The Reno Gazette's coverage reveals why racists continue to attack in the state of Nevada with impunity. In this case, the accused white attacker is the son of a retired police detective in Lyon County, Nevada.

Reno Sparks Indian Johnny Bonta was not only beaten and stabbed, but the attackers attempted to slit his throat, which is attempted murder. His son-in-law was also beaten in the attack by three men. Johnny Bonta, the victim, was jailed with a broken nose and cuts and bruises. He was denied medical treatment in jail. Police refused to take a statement from the family. Johnny Bonta was never charged and was only released from jail when tribal authorities intervened.

The Reno Gazette reporter takes the hit and run approach, saying the victims, the Bontas, could not be reached for comment by press time. This is unacceptable, reprehensible reporting in a hate crime.

Forbes did a far better story reporting the hate crime. However, if Forbes did not actually interview the family, then credit should be given to Censored News, or the subsequent copycat reporters who waited for Censored News to take all the risks, and then eventually came out of hiding to collect their paychecks.

The hate crime took place on May 24. The Reno Gazette woke up from its snooze on Wednesday, July 6, in time to do some damage control for the family of a retired white police officer.

Mainstream news reporters, shouldn't think that I'm doing their work for them, so that they can sit in your easy chairs and collect a paycheck off my efforts. That includes Indian Country Today, and its "reporter" that I haven't seen out on a news story in the past 29 years.

And that includes you Reno Gazette Journal.

For all of you reporters who want to know what is in the "Ch---a La Migra" downloads from Arizona police files, please feel free to stay up all night, every night, downloading torrents, zip drives and software updates so you can read, study and evaluate the massive data.

Here's the original articles from Censored News on the hate crime, a portion of which also appeared on Narcosphere:
Reno Sparks Indian beaten in hate crime (June 6):
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2011/06/reno-sparks-indian-beaten-in-nevada.html
Hate crime attackers talked about it on Facebook
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2011/06/attackers-in-nevada-hate-crime-talked.html
 

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 32 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 32 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.