Standing Rock Sioux Chairman to U.N. 'Stop Dakota Access Pipeline'

 

Standing Rock Chairman Dave Archambault appealed to the United Nations Human Rights Council today to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline, after guard dogs attacked women and children, and burial places were intentionally bulldozed.


By Brenda Norrell

Photo: Attack dog with blood on its teeth attacking Native American women and children defending burial place on Sept. 3.

 

GENEVA -- Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II addressed the United Nations Human Rights Council today and urged the U.N. to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Chairman Archambault told the U.N. Human Rights Council that the Standing Rock Sioux Nation is a sovereign nation, located in the United States, whose sovereignty is recognized by the legally-binding treaties of 1851 and 1868, and signed by traditional government Oceti Sakowin.

Oil companies are causing the deliberate destruction of their sacred places and burials, he told the U.N.

"Dakota Access Pipeline wants to build an oil pipeline under the river that is the source of our nation's drinking water."

"This pipeline threatens our communities, the river, and the earth."

Oil companies and the U.S. Government have failed to respect their rights, he said, describing the struggle for the "benefit of our children not yet born."

Chairman Archambault said that today the pipeline construction continues, although it is temporarily stopped near the Standing Rock Sioux Nation.

Chairman Archambault said Dakota Access Pipeline has knowingly destroyed graves and sacred sites with bulldozers, and used attack dogs against the people who protect the people's water and sacred sites.

"I condemn all violence, including the use of guard dogs."

"Our courts have failed to protect our sovereign rights, our sacred places and our water."

Chairman Archambault called on the U.N. Human Rights Council and all member states, to condemn the destruction of their sacred places, and to stop the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline, in order to "protect the environment, our nation's future, our culture and our way of life."

Earlier, on Sept. 3, Dakota Access Pipeline security guards attacked women and children with attack dogs and mace, as they defended the burial grounds of ancestors. Dakota Access Pipeline knowingly sent bulldozers to destroy the ancestral burial place, after it was identified the day before, on Sept. 2.

North Dakota targeted the media with arrest, issuing arrest warrants for Amy Goodman, producer of Democracy Now, and Cody Hall, Lakota spokesperson for Red Warrior Camp. Hall spent four days in jail on misdemeanor criminal trespass charges. Then, last week, the livestreamers, Unicorn Riot, were pointed out by police, arrested and jailed.

While arresting those defending the Missouri River from the pipeline, and defending the burial places, the State of North Dakota has refused to arrest the security guards who attacked the defenders. The online community found it easy to identify Frost Kennels of Ohio, from its license plate at the scene of the attack, and four former Bismarck police officers acting as private security.

The State of North Dakota filed felony charges against young people who locked down to heavy machinery to stop the pipeline last week. Police in riot gear with assault weapons arrested them in a sweep, with media and medics pointed out and arrested.

Although there were misleading news reports that the pipeline had been stopped, the pipeline continued tearing through the earth near Bismarck.

Today, Native Americans are protesting at the Morton County Jail, as one of the water defenders, Lakota grandmother Olowan  Martinez, continues to be incarcerated.

Following a flow of steady lies from Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier, incorrectly stating that the water defenders were armed and violent, the Governor of North Dakota called out the National Guard. It has been monitoring a checkpoint near the Standing Rock Camp, where thousands are camped. The ACLU said this checkpoint is a violation of Constitutional Rights to assemble and voice free speech.

The largest stocks in Dakota Access Pipeline are owned by Energy Transfer Partners of Dallas, Texas, whose CEO is Kelcy Warren, and Enbridge Energy Partners, in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Alberta is the home region to the tar sands mining that has already poisoned the land and water for Cree and surrounding communities.

After the Keystone XL pipeline was halted, this new pipeline was permitted in segments, to avoid detection, and includes pipeline segments with transfer points all the way from the Alberta tar sands to the Gulf of Mexico.

Currently, protesters in Iowa are being jailed as they defend their small farms from seizure by eminent domain, and the threat of poisoning the waterways of Iowa.

Copyright Brenda Norrell, no portion may be reproduced without permission.

brendanorrell@gmail.com

Read more about the attacks on Standing Rock water protectors, and arrests by the State of North Dakota and Morton County Sheriff at Censored News www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

Below: Attack dogs from Frost Kennels in Ohio attack women and children defending burial place on Sept. 3.

Also see: Mercenaires identified attacking Standing Rock burial place: 

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/09/torchlight-mercenaries-identified.html


About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.