Native American Women, Water Protectors of Standing Rock, in Norway on Pipeline Divestment Delegation

Indigenous Women of Standing Rock and Allies to Speak Out During Divestment Delegation to Norway

By Brenda Norrell

 

OSLO, Norway -- Native American women who took a stand at Standing Rock in North Dakota to defend the water from a crude oil pipeline under the Missouri River are arriving in Norway to urge divestment in the Dakota Access Pipeline.

These are Native American women who were arrested and jailed in dog kennels by Morton County, North Dakota, with numbers written their arms, as was done by the Nazis.

These are Native women who faced the rubber bullets of militarized police and water cannons in freezing temperatures. These are women who created the legal collective for water protectors who were arrested, now numbering more than 600. Photo: Military and police arrive on Sept. 28 with loaded shotguns and tear gas as Standing Rock water protectors prayed.

Beginning today in Norway, March 25, and continuing through April 2, 2017, the ‘Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Norway: Experiences from Standing Rock,’ will engage with financial institutions and public officials, civil society groups and public forums, and press and media to share their experiences, concerns and calls for international solidarity and justice, said the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) WECAN in a statement today.

“All of the Delegates have been engaged on the frontline of the Standing Rock resistance effort and other work to oppose extractive developments in their homelands and to protect the natural systems of life and Indigenous rights.”

Delegates include Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle (Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota living and working on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation); Wasté Win Young (Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer); Tara Houska (Anishinaabe, tribal attorney, National Campaigns Director of Honor the Earth, and former advisor on Native American affairs to Bernie Sanders); Autumn Chacon (Diné/Navajo writer and performance artist); and Michelle Cook (Diné/Navajo, human rights lawyer and a founding member of the of the Water Protector Legal Collective at Standing Rock) - with the support of Delegation organizer Osprey Orielle Lake (Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, WECAN) and documentary filmmaker, Tanyette Colon.

Wasté Win Yellowlodge Young, Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa, member the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, said, “The United States Army Corps of Engineers recently permitted the Dakota Access Pipeline, which would carry crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois, where it would hook up to other pipelines and refineries. The inevitable pipeline break on the river will result in catastrophic contamination of the water supply for 17 million people downstream, including our people.”

Michelle Cook, Diné (Navajo) human rights lawyer and founding member of the Water Protector Legal Collective at Standing Rock, said, "Making indigenous human rights abuses visible is critical in ending human rights abuses against Indigenous peoples. Indigenous women deserve spaces where they can share their personal testimonies regarding the impacts of extractive industries on their lands, lives, bodies, and human rights. This delegation provides the rare opportunity, for Indigenous women to meet face to face with the international banks who fund the DAPL and oil and gas extraction in their traditional territories.”

Dr. Sara Jumping Eagle, Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota living and working on the Standing Rock Sioux Nation, said, "The connections between who we are as Lakota Oyate -- our health, our lands and water, our spirituality, our self-empowerment and self-esteem -- are deeply rooted; the actions we take to protect our land and water, our future, and our children's water can only help us all. We all have the power -- wowasake -- within us to make a difference in this world."

Read the full press statement: http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2017/03/norway-women-of-standing-rock-to-speak.html

Media Contact:

General requests - Emily Arasim, +1(505) 920-0153, emily@wecaninternational.org

Urgent requests in Norway - Osprey Orielle Lake, +1(415) 722-2104, osprey@wecaninternational.org

(Below: Excessive force against unarmed, peaceful water protectors camped at Standing Rock, by Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier and militarized police. Photo copyright Rob Wilson published with permission.)

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.