Navajo Medicine People oppose Horse Slaughter

Traditional Navajo Medicine People oppose Horse Slaughter: 'The Horse is our Medicine'
 
By Brenda Norrell
Photo Dine' Leland Grass
 
"The horse is our medicine," states the resolution of the Nahooka Dine', traditional Navajo medicine people opposing the slaughter of the horse. The resolution was passed by traditional Dine' practitioners gathered at lower Black Mesa on the Navajo Nation.
 
"The Horse is our medicine and has helped us survive many hardships, they must be given respect and honored for their sacred place within the Creation, as they possess the same fundamental right to Life as we, Five Fingered Ones do," says the resolution passed with 32 in favor and none opposing on Aug. 26, 2013.
 
Nohooka Dine' said the capture, imprisonment and slaughter of horses threatens traditional Dine' spirituality and culture. Further, the medicine people said that the Navajo Nation government's support of horse slaughter violates the way of life and being of traditional Dine', the Ke'.  
 
Nahooka Dine' said the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples requires both the Nation Nation and United States governments to consult with Indigenous Peoples who are guaranteed the right to free, prior and informed consent.
 
The Navajo Nation government's support of horse slaughter represents recklessness and continues the assimilation of boarding schools when Navajo children's hair was cut and they were forbidden to speak their Dine' language. The Navajo Nation is demonstrating recklessness to Navajo children, a behavior that leads to domestic violence and drug abuse. The tribal government is demonstrating the same behavior that led to the slaughter of the bison.
 
For permission to repost this article or photo: brendanorrell@gmail.com

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.