Dine' Medicine People: Respect Horse Nation without outside intervention

 

Dine' Medicine People: Honoring Great Horse Nation shouldn't depend on outside influences

 

By Brenda Norrell

Photo Jones Benally and son Clayson Benally, courtesy Nohooka Dine'

KAYENTA, Arizona -- Dine’ Medicine People say Navajo leaders should respect the Horse Nation without needing the outside intervention of the former New Mexico Governor and Robert Redford. The Nohooka Dine’, now joined by the largest group of Dine Medicine People, the Dine’ Hataalii Association, have called for a halt to the roundup and slaughter of horses on the Navajo Nation.

Dine' Medicine People said that regardless of the admonitions of the Dine’ Hataalii Association, traditional Dine’ people and others, Navajo President Ben Shelly and his administration continued to round up horses for slaughter.

Many elders, medicine people and traditional people welcomed the announcement last week that President Shelly reversed his position on horse slaughter. The reports indicate that Shelly entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with former Governor of New Mexico Bill Richardson to stop the roundup and slaughter.

While elders and traditional leaders approved of the announcement, many were concerned that it took the outside intervention of Governor Richardson and Robert Redford to persuade Shelly to reverse course, said the Dine’ Medicine People in a statement on Tuesday.

“The elders and medicine people have also expressed concern that this attempt at livestock reduction would soon extend to cattle, sheep and other livestock. These traditional leaders request to be included as a party to discussions on how the livestock reduction issue, in its entirety, should be addressed going forward. It is important that future discussions pertaining to MOU’s and livestock reduction involve representatives from the Nohooká Dine’, the Dine’ Hataalii Association and the Elders and Medicine People of the Dine’.”

Leland Grass of the Nohooka’ Dine’, said, “Horses are not only a symbol of the Dine’ people, The Great Horse Nation is a part of the Great Covenant, as a supernatural being, it possesses incredible power, it is inextricably tied to our spiritual way of life and our cultural traditions.”

Read full statement: http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2013/10/dine-medicine-people-horse-nation.html

Meanwhile, Dine’ Citizens against Ruining our Environment, Dine’ CARE, will hold a press conference on Wednesday morning at 10 a.m. at the Navajo Council Chambers opposing the Navajo Nation’s purchase of the Navajo Mine.

While Navajos press the Navajo Nation Council to leave behind the dirty coal industry and its legacy of death and disease, Navajo politicians continue to rely on the most polluting form of energy on the planet -- coal mines and coal fired power plants -- rather than make a transition to sustainable green energy sources.

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

Personal Website
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.