Arivaca Arizona rises up against Occupying Army of US Border Patrol

 

Arivaca residents are once again fighting the Occupying Army of the US Border Patrol, and the corporate profiteering and failure of the mainstream media, which threatens to destroy their border community

 

Article and photo by Brenda Norrell

Photo: The US spy tower at Arivaca, part of the $1 billion flop.

ARIVACA, Ariz. -- The folks of Arivaca, Arizona, have once again risen up against the Occupying Army of the US Border Patrol. Earlier in Arivaca, when the US constructed and pointed a spy tower at their homes, the good folks of Arivaca flew kites around it.

Then, the Border Patrol finally said the spy towers didn't work anyway. The equipment did more to damage the bats, birds and pollinators. Border Patrol also said agents couldn't tell the difference between a coyote, cow and human invading with their spy tower equipment. It was all worthless anyway since the massive desert mountains to the south prevented a view of the border.

The US spy tower at Arivaca was one of those in the border spy tower flop constructed by Boeing and Elbit that wasted $1 billion on the Arizona border. Now, US Homeland Security has awarded a new US spy tower contract to Elbit Systems, the Israeli defense contractor responsible for Apartheid security around Palestine.

 

The Israeli spies of Elbit Systems are now constructing US spy towers on sovereign Tohono O’odham land on the Arizona border, located west of Arivaca on the Arizona border. The US spy towers are pointed at the home of traditional O'odham. O’odham human rights activists -- who are stalked by Tohono O’odham government and police, and the US Border Patrol agents -- say the Tohono O’odham government is co-opted and controlled by the US government and is corrupt.

The ACLU of Arizona sent a letter yesterday to the U.S. Border Patrol demanding that the agency immediately stop interfering with the First Amendment rights of the residents of Arivaca, Arizona, to protest and to photograph government activities that are in plain view on a public street.

"The dispute is part of a larger developing story in Arivaca that is actually a pretty incredible tale of citizens rising up against governmental abuse and repression in their own community," the ACLU said.

“People are understandably angry at this extreme militarization of their community. So a number of Arivaca residents have come to together to form an organization called People Helping People. It's a true grassroots effort, led by community members,” the ACLU said.

Read more about Arivaca’s action at Censored News http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2014/04/arivaca-arizona-rises-up-against.html

Copyright Brenda Norrell

For permission to repost brendanorrell@gmail.com

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.