Tipis pitched on National Mall in Keystone pipeline fight

 

Cowboy Indian Alliance takes Keystone pipeline fight to Washington DC!

 

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Update Tuesday: Faith Spotted Eagle, Dakota, said in Washington today that Indian women are ready to defend their land from the Keystone XL pipeline. Read more:

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2014/04/faith-spotted-eagle-indian-women.html

 

Article by Brenda Norrell

Photo two by Farhad

 

WASHINGTON DC -- Native Americans, farmers and ranchers united with grassroots and environmental groups and pitched their tipis on the National Mall today, sending a spiritual message to President Obama to say, “No!” to the Keystone XL pipeline. The coalition is in DC as a voice to protect sacred water and land for future generations.

In the "Reject and Protect" campaign, there's a week of actions against the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, in Washington and in local communities, from April 22-27, 2014.

The Cowboy and Indian Alliance and allies invite folks from across the country to visit the tipi camp on the National Mall and participate in the actions.

“We need all hands on deck to bear witness all week. Join us in showing the strength of our communities. We call upon President Obama to take this historic step in rejecting Keystone XL in order to protect our land, water and climate,” organizers said.

If you can only make one event during the week, the most important day is Saturday, April 26, when thousands will be gathering at the Camp for a tipi presentation ceremony and procession.

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader among the Dakota, Lakota, Nakota people, said, “Each of us is put here in this time and this place to personally decide the future of mankind.  Do you think that the Creator would create unnecessary people in a time of danger? Know that you are essential to this world. The biggest cancer spreading upon Mother Earth is the tar sands.”

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, 19th Generation Keeper of the White Buffalo Calf Pipe, blessed the tarsands resistance spiritual camp on Cheyenne River in South Dakota. A second Spiritual Camp is set up on Rosebud Lakota land in South Dakota to protect the water and land from the threat of the Keystone XL pipeline.

Back in South Dakota, Joye Braun and other Lakotas from Cheyenne River discovered their bus would not make it to the Reject and Protect action in DC. They headed out in their van and hit a deer. They made it back home safely in the busted van this weekend. Hopefully non-profits or others will be able to fly the group to DC. Joye said a second vehicle from Cheyenne River, with Robin LeBeau and grassroots Lakotas, is on its way. Joye recently halted an oilfield megaload on Cheyenne River Lakota land all by herself.

United in struggle, Chief Reuben George, Tsleil-Waututh, said, “One thing I can say right off the bat is that we are winning. When we come together like this, we become stronger. There is no price for our water and lands. The lessons we receive from Mother Earth is to become better human beings.  We give back to the earth and the land. The pipelines do not do that. We are going to win!”

Schedule for this week: http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2014/04/cowboy-indian-alliance-in-dc-reject-and.html

 

Article by brendanorrell@gmail.com contact to reprint in full

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.