Journalists failing Indigenous Peoples with stay-at-home plagiarism

Who will cover the news today?

 

By Brenda Norrell

As stay-at-home plagiarizers continue to produce fake news, the words of journalist Scherer Garcia, who just passed to the Spirit World, reminds journalists of their high calling. Garcia said it is the job of journalists to interview everyone. Garcia pointed out that it is not the work of a journalist to solve the problems. He reminded us of the art of the interview, and that the reality of journalism is to be present.

If it had not been for journalism and the need to be present, I would not have been at the International Water Forum in the Yaquis Vicam Pueblo in Sonora, Mexico, in 2012. It was there that I met Mario Luna, spokesman for the Traditional Authority in Vicam, who is now in prison. Mario and Yaqui spokesman Fernando Jiménez Gutiérrez are both in prison as a result of the Yaqui speaking out to defend their water rights. Vicam Yaqui have maintained a highway barricade to protest the theft of their water for an aqueduct to carry Rio Yaqui water to the city of Hermosillo. The Mexican government imprisoned the Yaqui spokesmen.

Today in the news, Dineh (Navajos) are walking across their sacred lands to protest fracking. Dineh youths are calling attention to the resources being ripped from their homeland, the Navajo Nation. Oil and gas drilling violates the sacred region. Peabody Coal, one of the most polluting companies on earth, poisons the land, water and air of Navajos with its coal mine and power plant on the Navajo Nation.

The Dineh youths, walking in the Journey for our Existence, said, “Since the 1920's, our land and people have been sacrificed for energy extraction for oil, gas, uranium, and coal, which is poisoning our land, water, air, and people. Despite being at the forefront of energy extraction, our people do not see its benefits; approximately one-fourth of our people today live without electricity and running water on the Navajo Nation, while our economy functions at an unemployment rate of 60 percent, and our young people are leaving due to lack of opportunity. (Photo right: Dineh walkers against fracking.)

Also, in the news today, the ban on Mexican American Studies, and the ban of Chicano and Native American books, by Tucson Public Schools, will be in federal court in San Francisco today.

The question remains, which reporters will be present, and which ones will stay home and plagiarize and then work hard to deceive their readers into believing that they are journalists out covering the news.

Garcia said, “The world has become harder and I think journalism will have to become harder to stay faithful to reality, its window that can’t be bribed. If the rivers turn red and extend to the valleys populated by the dead victims of hunger and disease, journalism will have to tell about it with images and words. It pains me to say: a government that values itself for its image is a frivolous government. Heavy tasks await journalists. That is your passion.”

More on these issues at www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

brendanorrell@gmail.com

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.