Narco News: Authentic Journalism, Toughest Job in America

Thank you to Narco News for 15 years of the toughest unpaid job in America

By Brenda Norrell

For journalists, there are few jobs that require more courage than reporting on the so-called drug war in Mexico. Journalists in Mexico are continually murdered and disappeared as the United States’ ATF (Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms) is exposed running assault weapons to the cartels.

In the US, one media outlet has the courage to expose the real role of the United States in the so-called drug war in Mexico, as the United States continues to play its role in destabilizing Mexico. Al Giordano’s Narco News Bulletin is what it says it is: Authentic journalism.

On a personal note, I would like to thank Al and the writers at Narco News for their courage and for giving me the opportunity to post articles at Narco News, which have been viewed globally by way of Google News for many years. When few others would allow me to publish, Narco News gave me a means to publish news of my travels with the Zapatistas and the struggle for dignity, autonomy and justice. Narco News also exposes the reality of the US/Mexico border.

While the mainstream media focuses on creating xenophobia of migrants -- and padding the pockets of border contractors and private prisons -- Narco News exposes the truth, including US Border Patrol agents running drugs, US spy towers on Tohono O'odham land, and drones on the border.

A recent message from Al captures the essence of both authentic journalism and insight into the world of online journalism without pay. I find these words inspiring, and hope you will find these words are an inspiration to write, and read, authentic journalism.

Al Giordano, publisher of Narco News:

I recently read about a prominent blogger who announced that he won’t be doing that work any more after fifteen years. He said he was tired. He wanted to do something else, to go out and live a life outside the Internet. It’s an understandable position. I thought, “Hey, we’ve been going for the same fifteen years. Is it time to hang up our cleats, too?” No way! The truth is I speak for the entire team when I say we love doing this work. We’ve never felt “trapped inside the Internet” because the work of reporting, teaching and learning at the School of Authentic Journalism brings us, day after day, in contact with the real people of the real world. I think another reason why others have burnt out but we’re still going strong is that we pace ourselves. We don’t follow an arbitrary monthly, weekly or daily deadline. We don’t publish “news” when there is nothing new to say. When it’s been time to remain silent, we’ve done that. When there’s been a lot to say, we’ve produced original reporting at amazing velocity and volume without ever sacrificing quality. We think that’s a better model for journalism than just filling a “news hole” because advertisers need newspapers to do so whether or not there is news.

Support Narco News here: https://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/5072/my-am-rica-there-are-man...

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

Personal Website
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.