Apache invite Europeans for Global Resistance at Oak Flat 2016

 

Apache resistance to copper mining on sacred land becomes symbol of global resistance

 

By Brenda Norrell

Chi'Chil'Bilda'Goteel (Oak Flat) Arizona -- Apache Wendsler Nosie invited European supporters to come to Oak Flat in mid-March of 2016 and join forces with Apaches in global resistance. Wendsler said the resistance to copper mining on Apache sacred ground at Oak Flat is not only protecting Oak Flat from Resolution Copper, but it is becoming a catalyst to unify Native people globally against the corporations who seek to destroy their land, water and air.

Standing in the heart of the resistance camp here, Nosie sent a special invitation to supporters in Europe to gather here in mid-March of 2016.

Nosie also sent a message of solidarity to Mauna Kea in Hawaii where Native people are resisting telescope construction on their sacred mountain. Nosie himself was arrested and jailed here in Arizona, by the University of Arizona in Tucson, as he prayed on Mount Graham during the long years of resistance to protect Mount Graham from massive telescope construction.

A special invitation is being extended to Bolivia President Evo Morales to come to the global resistance gathering here in March of 2016.

While welcoming European allies, Nosie said it is time to put pressure on the United Nations to be more than empty words for Indian country.

Recently, Apache traveled by caravan to Washington and rallied to demand the repeal of the land exchange that was sneaked through in the defense bill by Arizona Sen. John McCain and other Arizona politicians, which would open this sacred land for Resolution Copper mining.

Since then, Save Oak Flat! has become a battle cry. Recently, in solidarity, Navajos chased Sen. McCain off their land, and chased his car to the airport. McCain is responsible for extermination policies on Black Mesa and the theft of land and water rights throughout Indian country.

On Oak Flat, Apaches youths and elders are occupying this sacred ground, defending this ceremonial ground for future generations. Their Apache ancestors remain the symbol of resistance, showing them the way to fight, and to fight for survival.

Nosie's granddaughter, Naelyn Pike, 16, shared the essence of what this sacred land means for Apaches. On the caravan to DC, the photographs of Naelyn in New York became a symbol of hope and resistance that flashed through the media.

"This is my way of being as an Apache girl," she said, standing in the heart of the Oak Flat campground.

This is the sacred ground of her childhood, a place of ceremonies, a place where she watched the acorns fall, and a place to go to the springs and petroglyphs.

Read Naelyn’s interview:

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2015/09/apache-invite-europeans-for-global.html

 

 

For permission to repost this article brendanorrell@gmail.com

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.