In the Bittersweet Days of the Summer Solstice

 

In the bittersweet days of the summer solstice, beauty, tragedy and loss are interwoven

 

Article by Brenda Norrell

brendanorrell@gmail.com

Photo by Canyon Country Rising Tide: Seed planters arrested on Utah tarsands mine

 

The past few days have been bittersweet. We are sad to share with you the passing of Jim Boyd, Colville, who will be remembered for his kindness and his award-winning music.

The Native American Music Awards said, “It is with great sorrow and profound sadness that the Native American Music Awards (NAMA) shares the announcement from The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation on the passing of multiple award winner and Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, Jim Boyd. On Tuesday, June 21st, Jim Boyd reportedly died due to natural causes. He was 60 years old.”

From the south, we hear of the deaths of the teachers and their supporters shot by police as they took their last breaths for justice in Oaxaca.

We learned of the brutal US forces -- which included the US Border Patrol -- who trained Honduras military and the assassins who had Berta Caceres on their hit list.

From the north, we hear this news, that the publisher of Mohawk Nation News, Kahentinetha, Mohawk grandmother, was sitting in the dark, with her electricity cut off.

This comes with the uplifting news from Arlene Bowman, Dine', and her travel to the Dene Language Conference in Yellowknife. The news is that the language is alive -- from the far north, to the west coast of California, to the Southwest lands of Dine' (Navajo) and Apache.

And the struggle for justice, autonomy and dignity continues -- from the Zapatistas in Chiapas, to the Dine' resisters on Big Mountain, to the Dakota Access pipeline fighters at Sacred Stone camp in North Dakota, to the seed planters at the tarsands mine arrested in Utah, to the streets of St. Louis where Peabody Coal festers in the bowels.

Are the news rooms empty in the United States? Where are the journalists whose calling requires them to be present and out there covering the news. Are they on a permanent holiday in their easy chairs?

Three stories from Native Americans reveal planting as resistance. First,  the resistance to the Utah tarsands mine, where 20 people have been arrested while sowing seeds for the next generation. Then, there are the Poncas, planting resistance to the Keystone XL Pipeline. Finally, Western Shoshone searched for places to plant willow saplings on their walk to Yucca Mountain, now targeted with high level nuclear storage that would be hazardous for a million year. The sacred mountain is at the Nevada Test Site, where the scars and radiation remain of the US reckless atomic bomb testing on Western Shoshone land.

Canyon Country Rising Tide reports 20 people have been arrested sowing seeds for a new generation, resisting the tarsands mine in Utah on the Colorado Plateau.

"Kim, Nihigaal Bei Iina said, “We must remember that if we do not fight we cannot win, we don’t even have a chance of winning. By planting seeds we have a chance of winning another round for mother earth, we still have more battles to fight within us. These seeds planted will harvest another generation of fighters and warriors.”

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/06/utah-seed-sowers-arrested-on-united.html

Poncas are planting the Seeds of Resistance corn in the path of the Keystone XL Pipeline, reports Bold Nebraska.

“Once again we made the journey to the Tanderup farm from Oklahoma to Nebraska on the Ponca Trail of Tears to plant the sacred Ponca seeds of resistance,” said Mekasi Camp Horinek, son of Native American activist Casey Camp. “Not only in the soil of our ancestors’ homeland, but also in the hearts and minds of all the people that honor, respect and protect Mother Earth as the roots of these resistance seeds spread across the continents. So does the awareness of fight to stop keystone XL pipeline and protect mother earth for our future generations.”

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/06/sacred-ponca-resistance-corn-planted-in.html

 
Western Shoshone plant saplings as a blessing and to heal the land

During the walk to the Nuclear Test Site and Yucca Mountain in May, Western Shoshone Buck Sampson described how walkers searched for places to pray and plant willow saplings as a blessing and healing for the land.

Buck Sampson said they are sending a strong message to the employees at Yucca Mountain.

"Our Treaty of Ruby Valley of 1863 didn't say squat on our land and put radioactive waste here to store. They contaminated the underground water and desecrated Native burials and artifacts that were there a long time before the white immigrants came to Nevada 160 years ago."

"We Natives are still here with our culture and Native values on the land. We are still Trustees of the land," Sampson told Censored News.

Photos by Buck Sampson's son, long walker Carl 'Bad Bear' Sampson, Western Shoshone.

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/05/western-shoshone-run-blessings-for-land.html


Read more on these issues at Censored News www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

User login

Navigation

About Brenda Norrell

Personal Website
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.