Dakota Access Pipeline Terrorizing Native Americans

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dakota Access Pipeline Dirty Tricks Campaign: Federal judge chooses Big Oil over Native American rights, grants temporary restraining order against river defenders
 
By Brenda Norrell

Photo copyright Greg Grey Cloud at Camp of Sacred Stones

 

BISMARCK, North Dakota -- The billion dollar pipeline corporation Dakota Access pipeline was granted a temporary restraining order against the Dakota and Lakota land and water defenders who are sacrificing their all to protect their water source of the Missouri River from an underwater crude oil pipeline.

Dakota Access Pipeline has named Standing Rock Sioux Nation Chairman Dave Archambault, Councilman Dana Yellow Fat, and individual land and water defenders as defendants in an injunction filed yesterday by the pipeline in federal court here.

The move against the Dakota and Lakota officials, and individual land and water defenders, is seen as an attack on some of the most financially desperate people in America.

U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland granted Dakota Access pipeline a temporary injunction today, Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016, at 10:20 a.m., effective when the defendants are served.

Cheyenne River Lakota Natalie Stites urged the water and land defenders to continue in prayer and peaceful protest.

"Oyate! Allies! Take Courage!" said Stites, who was recently at the Sacred Stones Camp, and is a law graduate of UCLA.

"You have constitutional rights to freedom of speech and assembly. The temporary restraining order issued by the North Dakota District Court today prohibits interference in their operations, the surveying, construction, tool, etc."

"The order does not and cannot stop anyone from peacefully, prayerfully and non-violently protesting the desecration of our lands and poisoning of our water on the front line."

Judge Hovland's ruling clearly sides with the pipeline and big business. The order ignores the threat to Native Americans water source, the Missouri River, which will affect future generations.

Judge Hovland's ruling follows the pattern in Indian country of federal judges ignoring Indigenous Peoples rights, ignoring Treaty rights and ignoring tribal sovereignty.

Judge Hovland's order fails to adhere to the United States government's requirement of corporations to consult with Indian Tribes. Further, it fails to respect the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which requires "free, prior and informed consent" before corporations enter Indigenous Peoples territory, disrupt their natural resources, and engage in development.

Read more: http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/08/dakota-access-pipeline-dirty-tricks-big.html

 

 

 

Article copyright Brenda Norrell. No portion may be republished without permission or used for advertising or revenue producing. brendanorrell@gmail.com

 

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.