Native Youths Protest Bakken Pipeline in New York City

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As Native Youths protest Bakken pipeline at the White House, and in New York City, a new dirty crude oil pipeline is exposed

 

Article by Brenda Norrell

Top photo Urban Native Era; middle photo Tara Zhaabowekwe Houska

 

Protesting in front of the White House, and in New York City’s Union Square, Native American youth runners from Standing Rock in North Dakota battled the Dakota Access Pipeline now threatening the Missouri River.
The Native runners ran to Washington with these messages,  "Protect sacred water," and "You can't drink oil."
The Youth of Standing Rock Indian Nation ran 1,500 miles from North Dakota to Washington, D.C. to protect their water from the Dakota Access Pipeline, a crude oil pipeline being built on their river. They arrived in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, August 6.
"The Standing Rock Reservation Youth finished the run from North Dakota to Washington D.C in protection for the waters. The proposed Dakota Access Pipeline has just been recently approved by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers who are already starting construction in the Dakotas," the runners said in a statement.

"The runners peacefully demonstrated their opposition, their message is not that it’s not a matter of if the pipeline breaks, but when the pipeline breaks. They hand delivered a petition with 140,000 signatures saying, ‘no,’ to the Dakota Access Pipeline."
In New York City, one of the organizers said, “What’s very different about this specific pipeline is that it runs directly through the third largest reservation in this country. And when that crude oil transport pipeline breaks it will absolutely destroy many, if not all, of people’s resources that they need to live. Standing Rock natives have a saying ‘Mni Wiconi,’ which means: water is life, and they couldn’t be more on point.”

In New York, the Native youth runners were joined by Josh Fox (Gasland, Gasland II, How to Let Go of The World And Love All The Things Climate Change Can’t Change), Shailene Woodley (The Descendants, Divergent), and Rosario Dawson.
Back home in Cannonball, North Dakota, Dakota, Lakota and other Native Americans at the Sacred Stone camp are prepared, as construction threatens to begin.
Joye Braun, Cheyenne River Lakota, said, "Dakota Access has issued a 48 hour work order that was received by Standing Rock."
"The Camp of the Sacred Stones is a peaceful camp in prayer to stop the pipeline from destroying sacred water, eagle nesting sites, buffalo grazing, medicinal plants, and to protect the water intake for Standing Rock and the people along the Missouri river.
"We absolutely do not believe in violence," Braun said.
Braun was among those protesting at the North Dakota Capitol last week. Braun said the protest was "to bring awareness that oil is bankrupting our future."
"The North Dakota legislature was trying to fix a budget shortfall that was caused by giving tax breaks and a blank check to the oil industry," Braun said.
"Projects like Dakota Access pipeline and continued fracking are not helping the state but harming it."
Meanwhile, a new pipeline deal is now taking over where the Keystone XL pipeline failed. This new corporate scheme is to transport large amounts of dirty crude oil from North Dakota to the Gulf Coast.
The Financial Post reports that despite U.S. President Barack Obama’s rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline, new barrels of Canadian crude oil will soon make their way to the U.S. Gulf Coast.

This comes after a US $2.6 billion deal led by Enbridge Inc. to buy a U.S. pipeline system.

“Enbridge, the largest pipeline company in Canada, is teaming up with U.S. refiner Marathon Petroleum Corp. to buy a 49 per cent stake in two pipelines, the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Energy Transfer Crude Oil Pipeline, to provide a new route from North Dakota to refineries in Louisiana and Texas,” Financial Post reported.
Native Americans led a long campaign to halt the Keystone XL pipeline and protect the Ogallala Aquifer in South Dakota. Native Americans were arrested protesting the Keystone XL pipeline at the White House.

Although Canadian oil producers have been pushing for more access to Gulf Coast refineries for years, President Obama rejected TransCanada Corp.’s application to build the Keystone XL pipeline.

On Saturday, in front of the White House, Dakota and Lakota children and teenagers pleaded with President Obama to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and protect the Missouri River water.

Native youths pointed out that all over the U.S. and Canada, pipelines break and poison water supplies. The crude oil from Alberta’s tar sands has already poisoned the land and water of the the Cree in Canada. Widespread oil and gas drilling in North Dakota has poisoned the air, water and land. The “man camps” of oilfield workers are saturated with crime, destroying Native American communities.

Breaking News: Indigenous women violently arrested by Vancouver police during protest on anniversary of Imperial Metals toxic spill on Secwepemc land

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/08/vancouver-video-native-women-violently.html

Article copyright Brenda Norrell may not be republished without permission brendanorrell@gmail.com

Photos copyright by Urban Native Era and Tara Zhaabowekwe Houska

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.