Natives at Sacred Stone Camp stand in path of Dakota Access Pipeline

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UPDATE Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016:

Dakota and Lakota women thrown around and arrested by police as they defended their sacred land and the sacred water of the Missouri River. There were 12 arrests at the blockade of Dakota Access pipeline in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. See photos, videos and read the words of Dakota Lakota women at:

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/08/arrests-underway-at-dakota-access.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article by Brenda Norrell

 

Top photo courtesy Sacred Stones Camp and bottom photo by Jon Eagle, Sr.

 

CANNONBALL, North Dakota -- Native Americans stood in the path of the Dakota Access Pipeline this morning, ready to halt crews from drilling beneath the Missouri River and endangering the water source of Indian Nations with crude oil. The action at the Camp of the Sacred Stones comes after Dakota and Lakota youths ran more than 1,500 miles from North Dakota and protested at the White House and in New York City over the weekend. The Native American youths carried the message of defending sacred water.

Armed with banners and prayers, members of the Camp of the Sacred Stones stood together early this morning in the path of the Dakota Access Pipeline, as tipis went up on the front line of of the defense and resistance.

"Land defenders camped along the Missouri and Cannonball rivers remain undaunted in their vigilance to protect and defend the water, sacred and burial sites, and sensitive wildlife habitat in immediate danger from the pipeline being built by Energy Transfer Partners and Enbridge," Native Americans at the camp said in a statement today.

"Dakota Access issued a 48-hour work notice to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe on Monday, announcing that construction activities were scheduled to start on the Missouri River crossing, just north of the reservation, on Wednesday August 10th.  The tribe had filed a permanent injunction on July 27th and a preliminary injunction on August 4th in an effort to stop construction immediately, but the preliminary injunction hearing is scheduled for August 24th and their pleas are being ignored."

The Standing Rock Sioux Nation's preliminary injunction can be viewed here: http://standingrock.org/data/upfiles/media/Memo%20ISO%20Mtn%20for%20Preliminary%20Injunction_3.pdf

Standing peacefully in the path of the pipeline construction crews this morning, Dakotas and Lakotas urged recognition of their Treaties and adherence to federal laws.

"Campers have said they are disappointed that the proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline slated to carry fracked oil from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Patoka, Illinois is ignoring pending legal action taken by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other Oceti Sakowin tribes of the Lakota/ Dakota/ Nakota Nation in an effort to lay as much pipe as possible while ignoring treaty law, the Clean Water Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Historic Preservation Act, and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act," said the statement from the camp."

"Energy Transfer Partners is being allowed as a for-profit company to trump federal trust responsibilities guaranteed in the 1851 and 1868 United States treaties with the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota tribes, which remain the supreme law of the land as guaranteed in the US constitution."

“The notice from Dakota Access Pipeline to start construction in 48 hours is a blow to the people of Standing Rock.  We keep praying for the water and land. We are searching for every avenue through prayer to defeat this Black Snake.  Please remember water is life," said Ladonna Brave Bull Allard, landowner and director of Camp of the Sacred Stones.

 

Contact LaDonna Allard ladonnabrave1@aol.com

More articles and photos from Sacred Stone Camp and runners at www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

 

Notice: This article may not be reposted with advertising for profit making purposes.

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

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About Brenda Norrell

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http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.