Standing Rock Chairman arrested at Dakota Access Pipeline blockade

Standing Rock Chairman arrested at blockade. Burial places found near the pipeline crew. Oglala are sending 300 Lakotas from Pine Ridge to join the blockade and halt the pipeline.

 

By Brenda Norrell

Updated Sat., Aug. 13, 2016

Courtesy photo

Article copyright Brenda Norrell Narco News

 

CANNON BALL, North Dakota -- Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II and Councilman Dana Yellow Fat were arrested today at the blockade of the Dakota Access Pipeline, on Standing Rock Indian land in North Dakota at Cannon Ball.

Late Friday night, Dustin Thompson, community member, said burial places were located on Friday near where the Dakota Access pipeline crew is. Read the interview at Censored News here.

Yvonne Swan, Colville Nation, responded and pointed out that federal law requires the work to halt.

Swan told Censored News, "All destructive construction work should be stopped. Sacred sites should be protected under the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. The Lakota, Dakota and Nakota have the spiritual mandate, the God-given right, to take care of their land and life. Prayers for our relatives are going up."

 

Oglala sending buses of Lakota from Pine Ridge

The North Dakota Highway Patrol and Morton County Sheriff's deputies arrested the Standing Rock Chairman and Councilman and four others today at the blockade. Twelve others were arrested yesterday -- including Dakota and Lakota women who were thrown around by police and arrested, as they defended their sacred land and sacred water of the Missouri River.

Dakota Access pipeline plans to drill under the Missouri River for this crude oil pipeline and endanger the river water sources of Native Americans of the Missouri and Cannonball Rivers.

The Oyate Media Network reports that the president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and council has just announced its support to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe with buses of Lakotas from Pine Ridge, South Dakota.

“The Oglala are sending 300 Lakota on buses and a caravan to go and support them in their efforts to stop the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, the pipeline will be built under the Missouri River and the Mississippi River, it not only affects the Lakota Dakota Nakota nations but everybody who use the fresh water for daily life.”

 

Just another tarsands pipeline


The Dakota Access Pipeline is part of a pipeline system quickly approved, which began dig

ging in a matter of months. After years of protests, people were told that the tarsands pipeline had been halted. But the new pipeline system will carry the dirty crude oil from the tarsands in Alberta, Canada, that Native Americans and land owners have fought for years. It threatens land owners throughout the heart of the United States.

 

Now, people question: How long did President Obama know about this scheme, which is just another tarsands pipeline, quickly approved and doing damage in a matter of months.

 

Voices from the land

LaDonna Bravebull Allard, Lakota Dakota, land owner said, "The place where the pipeline will cross on the Cannonball is the place where the Mandan came into the world after the great flood, it is also a place where the Mandan had their Okipa, or Sundance. Later this is where Wisespirit and Tatanka Ohitika held sundances. There are numerous old Mandan, Cheyenne, and Arikara villages located in this area and burial sites. This is also where the sacred medicine rock is located, which tells the future.”

Avis Little Eagle of Standing Rock pointed out the media is uninformed of the facts about the aboriginal ownership of this land, according to the Treaty of 1868. Little Eagle said the media refuses to inform people that pipelines leak. Little Eagle is Hunkpapa Lakota woman, former Vice Chairwoman of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and current publisher of The Teton Times Newspaper.

“I read one of the news stories in the Sioux Falls Argus Leader and the reporter kept saying that the water protectors were outside reservation boundaries -- like ‘go back to the reservation’ Indians. That is one of the reasons Native Americans must write their own stories."

"The water protectors are standing their ground in 1868 Treaty Territory, which if the reporter knew their U. S. Constitution, is supreme law, above and before the Congress and the U. S. Courts. And as for the Army Corps, they are also ignoring treaty and Winters Doctrine Rights of the Lakota/Dakota Oyate who are protecting the Missouri River from a $3 billion dollar pipeline that will run 470,000 gallons of crude Bakken oil a day across the Mni Sose," Little Eagle said.

“It's not if it will leak but when, and there are 12 million people downriver that also rely on that river for drinking water, not to mention the wildlife that rely on the river. So I'm proud of and praying for our people, humble and pitiful as they are for taking on Big oil when every card in the deck is stacked against them. History will show they made the right choice. But sadly it will be after the river is contaminated and drinking water is fouled and wildlife and fish and the winged nation start dying from the contamination. Then the oil company will pack it's bags and move on and the U.S. EPA will cry that it doesn't have the money to clean up the river. So yes, stand strong Oyate.”

Tipiziwin Tolman, Standing Rock, said, “Standing Rock is my home. I grew up where the Missouri meets the Porcupine Creek. We are Hunkpapha Lakota and Wiciyena Dakota. We are Sitting Bull's people among many others. We are the people who have always lived along the Missouri river, on both banks. Our history is tied to this water, our identity is tied to this water. We come from this water. We were never displaced, this is where Creator put us.

"This water and this land recognizes our language and our prayers. This water, like all water gives us life and we all need water to live. This pipeline and all the oil fracking is pure poison. Please come to Standing Rock's northern border and stand to protect this pipeline from being built underneath our water, directly above our water intake where our drinking water comes from. When you turn on a faucet today, think of our people and what we are standing for. Calling for all Oceti Sakowin, all nations, to come stand together, come to the northern border of Standing Rock and stand for the future, be a witness for the water, and for the world.”

Jon Eagle, Sr. said, “The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe by resolution claim all stone features, stone cairns and stone effigies within the aboriginal homelands of the Oceti Sakowin. Wherever the buffalo roamed our ancestors left evidence of their existence and connection to everything in the universe. There is a prophecy among our people that told us one day man was going to go to far and when that time came the animal nations were going to show their sacred color. The birth of the white buffalo in Jamestown, North Dakota was a sign that we were in that time of prophecy. The Dakota Access Pipeline is crossing the aboriginal homelands of the Oceti Sakonwin and is destroying sites of religious and cultural significance to the tribes. DAPL will have an adverse effect on the land, the air and the water. Now is the time to go back to our sacred places and pray.”

 

Dakotas and Lakotas unite in pipeline fight

Today Rosebud Sioux Tribal Chairman William Kindle sent an official letter of solidarity and support to Standing Rock Chairman Dave Archambault, urging the people to battle this pipeline that threatens religious and cultural places of the Great Sioux Nations.
The Crow Creek Sioux Nation passed a resolution on Aug. 11 in full support of Standing Rock's blockade of the pipeline, pointing out that the pipeline and ultimate breaks in the crude oil pipeline will endanger the water sources of Dakota and Lakota Nations.
Yesterday, the crow Creek Chairman began his journey in support.
"On behalf of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribal Council and Tribe, I Brandon J. Sazue Sr., Crow Creek Sioux Tribe Chairman am on my way to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to offer our support in the opposition to Dakota Access Pipeline! We will stand with you my relatives. Whether we are Native, White, African American, etc. Our water is our most precious resource along with our children. We must all stand together in this most urgent of times. This is not about race, but about the human race! 'What we do today will make a difference tomorrow!' If there was ever a time to stand United, that time is now!"

Cheyenne River Sioux Vice Chairman Ryman LeBeau encouraged those at the barricade today.

"Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has been against DAPL since December 2015. Hand delivered this resolution to Army Corp Col. Henderson demanding consultation on DAPL project. Now we filed as interveners in Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's suit, against Army Corp for not consulting and because water is life, water is scared to us. Keep the prayers Up. Blehiciya po!" LeBeau said.

 

Jon Eagle, Sr., of Standing Rock said, "The Oceti Sakonwin are united. The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate tribal chairman and a delegation of Dakota showed up today to support their Lakota relatives. Yesterday the Crow Creek Tribal chairman showed up along with our Oglala relatives. Every band is now represented in defense of our nation. Wopila tanka icici yelo."


Dakota and Lakota youths ran from Standing Rock in North Dakota to the White House, protesting on Saturday, and urging President Obama to halt this pipeline. The youths protested again in New York City before returning home to join the blockade on their homelands.

For video and more photos, go to: http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/08/dakota-access-pipeline-digging-up-human.html

Please check out for updates.

No portion of this article may be republished without permission or used for commercial or profit making purposes. copyright brendanorrell@gmail.com

About Brenda Norrell

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.

User login

Navigation

About Brenda Norrell

Personal Website
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Biography

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. She is publisher of Censored News, focusing on Indigenous Peoples, human rights and the US border. Censored News was created after Norrell was censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today after serving as a longtime staff reporter. Now censored by the mainstream media, she previously was a staff reporter at numerous American Indian newspapers and a stringer for AP, USA Today and others. She lived on the Navajo Nation for 18 years, and then traveled with the Zapatistas. She covered the climate summits in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and Cancun, Mexico, in 2010.